Business Analysis as a Service

You would have to say that businesses have not been hugely successful in specifying IT systems. It is quoted that 60% of code in IT applications is never exercised. The systems that have been built have high complexity, are difficult to upgrade and consequently provide a lower return on investment.

Albert Einstein said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results”.

Maybe it is time we started doing things differently.

A key area that we need to look at is how Business Analysts (BA) are engaged to specify requirements for IT systems. Does someone yell out we need a BA body to help us? That person arrives and the business hopes they know what they are doing and that the correct requirements are identified. Alternatively, does the business specify the outcomes and deliverables required to build a fit for purpose IT system and engage someone against that?

If you are specifying the outcomes and deliverables for requirements specification you are utilising business analysis as a service, which is proven to obtain better results.

What can you expect from utilising business analysis as a service?

  1. Quality. If the IT system is specified precisely without waffly words using reams of paper but in clear requirements which trace to business needs (not wants of stakeholders), the IT development will be more likely a quality solution.
  2. Speed. If the requirements are targeted to only the business needs the analysis, design, build, test and implementation will be faster.
  3. Cost. If you build what is only needed the costs will be reduced.

As someone who delivers business analysis as a service I have found that I’m involved in early planning by focussing on outcomes and deliverables.  This enables an increase in response to demand, builds an understanding of business and business analysis processes, and allows allocation of BAs to a wider variety of projects.

Over the next 3 to 5 years PMI’s predicts that there will be:

  • An increase in the demand for business analysts (reported by 53 percent of organizations)
  • An increase in the integration of requirements management and business analysis with project management (reported by 52 percent of organizations)

Instead of answering your call for a BA by sending you some CVs for a 60 day engagement to do some stuff, I would recommend that try business analysis as a service. I would ask what are the deliverables and outcomes required, which will determine the length of time to satisfy your needs for requirements definition to build a fit for purpose IT system.